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DILLIGAF
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634 Posts
Theyare stuff to consumers. I'll be nice a leave it there.

Not saying zero effect. But over 77f it hurts your battery per degree. It would involve math to explain.
 

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DILLIGAF
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634 Posts
Cold Cranking Amps (CCA) CCA is a rating used in the battery industry to define a battery's ability to start an engine in cold temperatures. The rating refers to the number of amps a 12-volt battery can deliver at 0°F for 30 seconds while maintaining a voltage of at least 7.2 voltss
In some ways, the standard for CCAs is more of a marketing concept than a technical form of measurement for a battery’s output – it was started by the battery industry itself, and has stuck around in the mind of consumers for decades. Nevertheless, CCAs have now become the industry standard for measuring a battery’s starting power, and the term’s usefulness is in providing an apples-to-apples comparison when shopping for batteries.

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I dnot see why you cold nit crate a rsting for 50 degreen or 100. Other than explain it consumers
 

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DILLIGAF
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634 Posts
While it’s true that winter is a fairly common time for car batteries to die, some sources actually suggest that more batteries die in the summer than in the winter.

he science behind lead acid battery technology actually shows how both hot and cold weather can be unkind of the life and operation of a car battery. Even though the hot weather is a real battery killer, for a number of reasons, cold weather is also hard on car batteries.


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Note the tone. These are articles written for consumers.
 

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DILLIGAF
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634 Posts
Heat is a killer of all batteries, but high temperatures cannot always be avoided. This is the case with a battery inside a laptop, a starter battery under the hood of a car and stationary batteries in a tin shelter under the hot sun. As a guideline, each 8°C (15°F) rise in temperature cuts the life of a sealed lead acid battery in half. This means that a VRLA battery for stationary applications specified to last for 10 years at 25°C (77°F) would only live 5 years if continuously exposed to 33°C (92°F) and 30 months if kept at a constant desert temperature of 41°C (106°F). Once the battery is damaged by heat, the capacity cannot be restored.
 

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Again, no one here is denying that heat is bad for batteries. This debate started with you saying cold isn't bad and implying that anything above 77 F is worse. This is simply not the case. I can point to where you said cold isn't harmful, can you point me to a time where I said heat isn't harmful? I'll bet you cannot.
 

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I can add this, I own a diesel truck with full gauges. It is always HOT under the hood where my 2 Optimas live. Soo does that mean if I insulate and cool my batts with airflow they will last longer? Dunno but batt life has been pretty good to me. My air temp under hood is at least 20 degrees more if not 35 degrees more than outside temps. Dunno bout math but I do know cold temps discharge batts and that state of discharge is what ruins them, especialy lithium types. So maybe cold doesn't hurt directly but leads to failure if batt isn't maintained on charges. imop which is based on life experiences.
 

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DILLIGAF
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634 Posts
I may have over stated that cold is not harmful. But is not as bad as people make out, heat is probably worse.

If you read, I would draw that heat hurts the battery, where cold if it is an issue deal s or just here starting cold engines

I realize it involves math, but over 77 as I said batteries degrade.




Double post diet show up
 

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DILLIGAF
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634 Posts
It is hard starting engines when cold, cold may drain. But heat destroys batteries.

I stand by the 77 degree point. It would involves math and reading. So we are just going to have to disagree.

I work with 25 year old acid batteries. I am not a battery expert, but know a couple things. Plus I know how to Google consumer grade articles
 

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Static Stator Tests
First perform the static stator tests. With the ignition switch in the “Off” position, disconnect the regulator from the stator. Set the multimeter to “Resistance” or “Ohms” on the lowest scale, and insert one probe into one of the stator pin sockets. Touch the other probe to any chassis ground. If the display reads anything other than “Open” or the symbol for infinity, and shows any continuity at all, then you have a grounded stator and must replace it. Insert each probe into a stator socket. You should read around 0.2 to 0.5 ohms. If you show an open circuit with the “Open” or infinity reading or have higher resistance, then the stator is bad and you must replace it. If these tests all produce positive results, then the stator itself is good.
I will start by saying thanks for your post it helped me find out how to start with testing my stator.....with that said, following your instruction I am getting a 1.6 reading on all pins? Does this mean my stator is bad?
Thanks in advance for the help.
 
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