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Old, slow, nothing to prove
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought my Teryx with a hidden history of abuse. It had been run with little or no oil, and the damage had been patched enough to sell it to an unsuspecting buyer (me). I got one weekend of riding out of it before it started knocking. After exhausting all trouble shooting methods and determining that it was indeed a spun rod bearing, we pulled the engine, tore it down, and built it from the crank up. Total parts were $1080 from Dennis Kirk, plus sealant, oil, spark plugs, and odds and ends.

The first day was spent pulling the engine and tearing it down. Antother day was spent cleaning everything up while waiting for parts. A third day was spent putting it all back together, and the final day was reattaching all the wiring hoses, and linkages. Startup went without a hitch. It tried to start immediately, finally ran on one cylinder for a few seconds, and the other cylinder picked up within 10-15 seconds. Sounds great. Runs great. I have my buggy back, better than ever.
 

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Old, slow, nothing to prove
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The rebuild kit included the chain from the crank to the cross shaft and the ones to each head. Even though my chains only had 198 hours on them, they had been run without oil and had been overheated. I replaced them. All internal bearings, both roller and ball bearings, and the clutch side slick bearing were all included. I replaced the crank bearings but since I didn't have the tools to pull the blind bearings in the transmission, I left those in place. They all felt good and turned freely.

I was afraid to tackle this job alone, even though I am a former engine builder for air cooled VW engines and other imports and for a Ford dealership. I got my nephew, who worked for years at a Polaris and Honda dealer as a mechanic, to help me. Now that I've been through it, I think I could do it again. I just hope I never have to.
 

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Wow man, that is great of you to share and show it. Glad the result has turned out as planned and went relatively smooth it sounds. What is worse or took more time? Getting the motor out? Or rebuilding it?

That is awesome you have the shop, tools, and knowledge (with help). Priceless.
 

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Old, slow, nothing to prove
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Getting the motor out was a chore because we had never done it before. By the end of the first day we had the engine out and sitting on a steel table covered with cardboard. We tore it down enough to determine what it was going to need. The second day was spent finishing the tear down and pressure washing the major components. Then we had a week or 10 days wait for the rebuilt kit to arrive. Once we had parts in hand, assembly took one full day, about 12 hours. The most frustrating part was the timing chains. The manual could be a lot more clearly written on this subject. By the end of the assembly day we had the engine back in the frame and partiially hooked up.

I highly recommend the cardboard trick. Cover your work table with cardboard. It keeps the engine from sliding around. Dropped parts have a cushion before hitting the steel table top. Dropped objects are not as likely to roll away, and any leaked oil will be on the cardboard tather than the table itself.

We ran into a snag with exhaust gaskets. The rebuild kit sent two stock exhaust gaskets but this machine had a full Muzzy setup, pipes and all. They're bigger than stock and the stock gaskets wouldn't work. I hoped I could find some automotive substitute that would work, either a donut or a flange but no, it was not to be. My nephew who provided the expertise said the off road VW buggies are using Permatex copper silicone sealant instead of exhaust gaskets, so that's what we ended up using. So far it's working. Time will tell. I removed the stainless Muzzy cans and someone could have them cheap if they wanted them. I'm too old to listen to all that noise. I kept the Muzzy header pipes but had a muffler shop fabricate a manifold between those pipes and a stock stainless Teryx muffler so I'm back close to stock sound.

The service manual says to remove the roll cage to lift the engine out. We used a "cherry picker" with two sling straps and took the engine out the driver's door without removing the top of the cage.

The shop belongs to my nephew and was formerly used to fabricate custom Jeep frames. He uses it to store and work on his VW rock crawler buggies. A stock VW is 1600cc. His are 2230. When he was just a kid, I used to show him how to fix things. Somewhere along the line we switched places. His shop contains everything needed to build a VW buggy from scratch and then some. We lost one of the dowel tubes between the cylinder and head, so he made one on the lathe. In the background of the attached picture, you can see the massive press used to fabricate frame rails. This is the buggy that his wife drives.
 

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Old, slow, nothing to prove
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
He's long gone and not worth the trouble. Although it has crossed my mind to leave the ruined crankshaft lying in his driveway some time.
 

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Old, slow, nothing to prove
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Or maybe embedded in his windshield.
But he's long gone. He had been renting space from a friend after getting divorced and his reason for selling was so he could get his own place. IF I can believe anything he said. But he was two hours away and not work the effort it would take to find him now. I have a good machine with a new engine. I KNOW what's inside that motor now and it should last me for many years.
Let's go ride.
 

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Old, slow, nothing to prove
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
DANGER, WILL ROBINSON! (ok, you have to be old to get that one)
My engine fired up and ran great. Everything was perfect. Almost. I had a seeping oil leak at the alternator cover - the black plastic cover on the left side of the engine. I pulled the cover off and it was oily inside. Checking the above pictures you can see it was dusty dry when we tore it down. There's a sleeve that goes through a seal on that end of the crankshaft and the sleeve has an o-ring inside it. We didn't change that o-ring because there wasn't a new one in the kit. So I tore it back apart and replaced that 0-ring and claimed victory. That lasted until the first ride. I still had oil dripping on the header pipe and making spectacular smoke in the cockpit. I decided I had damaged the seal somehow and was going to order a new seal kit. I had saved the new parts boxes and most of the old parts. I googled that seal kit number and I came up with many red flags saying "this kit does not fit your machine" but that was the seal kit that came with the rebuild kit. It had to be right, right? Wrong.

I got into the exploded parts diagrams and found the specs for that particular seal. 28mm inside, 45mm outside, 7mm thick. I pulled the leaking seal out of the engine and test-fitted it onto the sleeve that goes through it. It was slopply loose. There was an actual air gap between the seal and the sleeve. Where the specs call for a 28mm inside diameter seal, they had sent me a 30mm seal. No wonder I had a leak. None of the other seals in the kit were anywhere close to those specs. Any time the engine tilted to the left, oil was literally pouring out around the end of the crankshaft. I dug the original seal out of the used parts and stuck it on the sleeve. Perfect fit but we had damaged it getting it out. It MAY be repairable (only bent, not torn) but I'll try the local dealers for a new one before I do that.

Next best option is to buy online and wait a few days. Repairing and reusing the original seal is only a very last resort.
This oil seal, Kawasaki part # 92049-1576, is used in several Kawasaki engines. It is exactly the same seal that Honda used in some 750 Shadow models under part #81201-MV1-003 so hopefully somebody will have it on a shelf today.
 

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DANGER, WILL ROBINSON! (ok, you have to be old to get that one)
My engine fired up and ran great. Everything was perfect. Almost. I had a seeping oil leak at the alternator cover - the black plastic cover on the left side of the engine. I pulled the cover off and it was oily inside. Checking the above pictures you can see it was dusty dry when we tore it down. There's a sleeve that goes through a seal on that end of the crankshaft and the sleeve has an o-ring inside it. We didn't change that o-ring because there wasn't a new one in the kit. So I tore it back apart and replaced that 0-ring and claimed victory. That lasted until the first ride. I still had oil dripping on the header pipe and making spectacular smoke in the cockpit. I decided I had damaged the seal somehow and was going to order a new seal kit. I had saved the new parts boxes and most of the old parts. I googled that seal kit number and I came up with many red flags saying "this kit does not fit your machine" but that was the seal kit that came with the rebuild kit. It had to be right, right? Wrong.

I got into the exploded parts diagrams and found the specs for that particular seal. 28mm inside, 45mm outside, 7mm thick. I pulled the leaking seal out of the engine and test-fitted it onto the sleeve that goes through it. It was slopply loose. There was an actual air gap between the seal and the sleeve. Where the specs call for a 28mm inside diameter seal, they had sent me a 30mm seal. No wonder I had a leak. None of the other seals in the kit were anywhere close to those specs. Any time the engine tilted to the left, oil was literally pouring out around the end of the crankshaft. I dug the original seal out of the used parts and stuck it on the sleeve. Perfect fit but we had damaged it getting it out. It MAY be repairable (only bent, not torn) but I'll try the local dealers for a new one before I do that.

Next best option is to buy online and wait a few days. Repairing and reusing the original seal is only a very last resort.
This oil seal, Kawasaki part # 92049-1576, is used in several Kawasaki engines. It is exactly the same seal that Honda used in some 750 Shadow models under part #81201-MV1-003 so hopefully somebody will have it on a shelf today.
I guess I'm old enough to get that one lol.

Sounds like the lead could be the o-ring and/or the seal? When you replaced the O-ring could you tell it was worn or shrunk down? Hopefully, that o-ring and new seal will be the answer.
 

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Old, slow, nothing to prove
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The O-ring was ok but I replaced it anyway. The seal was definitely the problem. Where it should have been a snug fit on that sleeve, there was actually an air gap where it was supposed to be sealing. In a revolting development, I learned this morning that every Kawasaki dealer in East Tennessee is closed on Monday. So tomorrow I'll be calling to see if someone has it in stock. Like I said, it's used in many different Kawasaki engines so it should be a commonly stocked item. If nobody local has it, I'll be ordering on line. This machine has been down all summer, it's time to ride!
My nephew will have his buggies at Windrock on Labor Day weekend and he has asked me to join him. I've got to hurry.
 

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Old, slow, nothing to prove
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Final chapter: Found the correct seal at Landsford Kawasaki in Crossville, TN. Nobody else in the East TN area had it in stock and they were quoting 3 to 10 days lag time. Crossville is 1.5 hours away. No brainer. They also had the internal O-ring so I got that too. Out the door for less than $10. Took them home, installed them, viola! Everything works. No leaks, no smoke, no noise. I have a brand new engine and this old buggy runs like a molested monkey.

We're done here.
 
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