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Discussion Starter #1
In a different post I said I like my Sedona Rip Saws. I still do. However, my fronts are wearing strangely and aggressively. The rears are fine. I have been doing an inordinate amount of road riding lately so wear is somewhat expected, but not like this. Anyone have any ideas why or solutions to my problem?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Toe in was adjusted to 1/8". It had been about 3/8". Adjustment didn't seem to have an affect on wear one way or the other.

I believe the tires have 1,400-1,600 miles on them. I didn't write down when exactly I put them on. I replaced the original Bighorns around 2,000. I'm not religious about rotating them but they do get rotated.

Am I expecting too much life out of a set of tires?
 

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I've heard if you don't rotate about every 500 miles on the wider tires like that they will start flat sporting on front
 

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I with PT. Rotate them. Are you riding a lot of asphalt? If so you may want to consider a different tire when the ripsaws wear out. Look at the Tusk Terrabites or tensor regulator style tires. They are more like truck tires and wear great.


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Discussion Starter #7
Rotating that frequently never crossed my mind. I completely avoided road riding with ATVs. Considering a different tire has become a consideration. Road riding is so common/acceptable "here". Thanks guys!
 

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Sedona Ripsaws are a very thick and hard tire. The Tusk Terrabites are a much softer compound by comparison. I don't know if this helps, or hurts tire wear, but I doubt very much that you will see better life out of them. Wear like you are seeing is very common for an off road tire that see's a lot of pavement. For maximum life, rotation is your friend.

If you regularly ride pavement and hard pack, you might also consider putting actual street tires on it.
 

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Sedona Ripsaws are a very thick and hard tire. The Tusk Terrabites are a much softer compound by comparison. I don't know if this helps, or hurts tire wear, but I doubt very much that you will see better life out of them. Wear like you are seeing is very common for an off road tire that see's a lot of pavement. For maximum life, rotation is your friend.



If you regularly ride pavement and hard pack, you might also consider putting actual street tires on it.


A Tusk Terrabite or tensor regulator will outlast a Sedona ripsaw on pavement 9 times out of 10 every time. I’ve seen it happen several times. It’s not just about the compound of the tire, you have to look at the tread pattern too.


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A Tusk Terrabite or tensor regulator will outlast a Sedona ripsaw on pavement 9 times out of 10 every time. I’ve seen it happen several times. It’s not just about the compound of the tire, you have to look at the tread pattern too.

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Thats fair. Your Terrabites were evenly worn at 50% life. How many miles do you think were on them when you were selling them?
 

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Thats fair. Your Terrabites were evenly worn at 50% life. How many miles do you think were on them when you were selling them?


I had roughly 900 miles on them. They were no where near 50% tread though. I had a brand new spare to compare them to and they were wearing great and evenly. I’d say the were 20-25% worn if that when I sold it.


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I think u rotate they will straighten out, might ride a little rough for a while, I have heard nothing but good about ripsaws. They should last several thousand miles
 

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happened to me, alignment

In a different post I said I like my Sedona Rip Saws. I still do. However, my fronts are wearing strangely and aggressively. The rears are fine. I have been doing an inordinate amount of road riding lately so wear is somewhat expected, but not like this. Anyone have any ideas why or solutions to my problem?
Definitively check your alignment, My front wheel alignment was so far off by the factory that dealer replaced front tires under warranty as they scrubbed at mind boggling speed.
After aligning with a laser level to about neutral to 1/8 toe the wear pattern went totally away on new rubber

search for alignment , there are several posts
 

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Discussion Starter #14
My friend mentioned suspension. I have not adjusted from the factory settings. Is this a possible consideration on top of the other points made in the thread?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Follow-up: So, about 10 months ago we adjusted toe in and I rotated the tires. Now, about 1,500 more miles on the tires and no noticeable wear whatsoever. Fewer road miles than before but still some road miles.
 

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In a different post I said I like my Sedona Rip Saws. I still do. However, my fronts are wearing strangely and aggressively. The rears are fine. I have been doing an inordinate amount of road riding lately so wear is somewhat expected, but not like this. Anyone have any ideas why or solutions to my problem?
exactly what i have seen. My T2 now runs on very slightly, close to zero toe in and my wear pattern is even. Now make sure you are running a good tire pressure. I dont have experience with the rip saws but I suggest you run over some white sheets of paper taped to the ground after you set your air pressure and see if you find some unusual pattern. I am not sure how you set your toe. I use a laser level strapped perfectly horizontal to the rear RIM not the tire!!!! and then measure from the laser beam to the front rim while my buddy adjusts the toe. Sloppy ball joints could also be an issue
Good luck
 
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