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Just bought my first utv, a new 2020 teryx 800. I was wondering what tools,gear,survival kits, etc do you guys bring when your offroading with this machine.
 

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2016 Teryx2, 2011 Brute Force, 2008 Vulcan Classic 1500
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Honestly? I probably carry more than I should =) Depending on budget, space and desire for riding conditions, I would consider the following levels. (Not at all a complete list but a good starting point)

Level One (minimum gear you should carry): Tire plug kit and a pump. Pack extra plugs! I would also add a fire extinguisher and a small first aid kit. And while not tools, you might also consider a cooler for drinks and/or snacks. Another surprisingly handy thing to have with you? Zip-ties! The uses are endless.

Level Two: A Spare tire, scissors jack and lug wrench to change the tire. Use a front wheel for a spare because it will work front or back. Some people like to include a battery powered impact wrench at this point. It does make things a lot easier and faster. Just remember to charge the battery!

Level Three: Small tool kit with sockets, wrenches, pliers, allen, etc. Make sure they are metric. It should have at least 60 pieces to be of value. Tow straps and a wench are recommended at this level as well. You bought a Teyrx, so you are probably not going to use most of these tools on your own bike, but may need them to help others. The tow strap is handy for dragging Polaris's back to camp. Some will tell you to also carry a spare belt, but the chances of you needing it are very small.
 

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It depends on your accessories too. I know I need a screwdriver and adjustable wrench to remove my windshield, so I carry those with me just in case. I carry screw drivers, adjustable wrenches, zip ties, tow strap, plug kit, air pump in a cheap toolbag strapped down in the cargo bed. Harbor freight tools are a good option for trail use and leave the good tools in the garage.
 

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I am also an "over prepared" kind of guy, but we ride in some pretty remote and technical areas sometimes. On longer trail rides I carry a general tool kit including all of the tools needed to change a belt. In that bag I also carry spare fuses, large and small zip ties, gorilla tape, and a few towels for the windshield. I also carry a small scissor type jack, tire plug kit and slime, along with ratchet straps and an air compressor powerful enough to re-seat a bead. For my recovery kit I have a 50' winch cable extension, snatch blocks, D-rings, tow straps and a small shovel. I also have a 4 gallon Rotopax full of fuel and a spare tire most of the time. I have a small first aid and survival kit, including basic first aid and medicines, lighters, multi tool, portable saw, etc. Then I have a small dry bag with a full set of spare clothes in it, including socks and underwear - and stocking hat and gloves if winter. I will also carry paper maps for the area as a backup if available. For parts I just carry a spare belt and tie rod ends. I realize that this sounds like a lot of stuff when you type it out, but it all fits in a plastic box that takes up about half of the bed in my T4 (except tire and fuel). And there is still room in there for some snacks, rain gear, etc.
Most of my buddies make fun of me for all the crap I take but just on the last trip alone we needed the tire kit, jack and pump (several times), tools for minor repairs, several spare fuses, the shovel for trail building, snatch block and winch extension, and a tow strap. We even had to use my 22 mm socket to try and sleeve together a broken tie rod on a can am commander.
If you're riding alone in remote areas, I would practice changing a belt so that you know the process and are prepared to access or change it if necessary. It is a pain in the butt, but not something that should leave you stranded in the backcountry.
Here is the checklist of tools I use to make sure I have everything needed to change a belt (I also have the procedure for doing it typed out if you're interested):
2 Spreader bolts for secondary clutch (M8x1.25 x 60mm or 2.5”)
Phillips Screwdriver
Battery Impact wrench
Small Flathead for wire connections
Large flathead screwdriver and pliers or tool for removing rivets
Crescent wrench
10 mm wrench
17 mm wrench
8mm socket
10mm socket
12mm socket
14mm socket
17mm socket
22mm socket (secondary clutch)
27mm socket (primary)
 

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Honestly? I probably carry more than I should =) Depending on budget, space and desire for riding conditions, I would consider the following levels. (Not at all a complete list but a good starting point)

Level One (minimum gear you should carry): Tire plug kit and a pump. Pack extra plugs! I would also add a fire extinguisher and a small first aid kit. And while not tools, you might also consider a cooler for drinks and/or snacks. Another surprisingly handy thing to have with you? Zip-ties! The uses are endless.

Level Two: A Spare tire, scissors jack and lug wrench to change the tire. Use a front wheel for a spare because it will work front or back. Some people like to include a battery powered impact wrench at this point. It does make things a lot easier and faster. Just remember to charge the battery!

Level Three: Small tool kit with sockets, wrenches, pliers, allen, etc. Make sure they are metric. It should have at least 60 pieces to be of value. Tow straps and a wench are recommended at this level as well. You bought a Teyrx, so you are probably not going to use most of these tools on your own bike, but may need them to help others. The tow strap is handy for dragging Polaris's back to camp. Some will tell you to also carry a spare belt, but the chances of you needing it are very small.
Hawk, i realize this may be in another thread but how do you manage cargo storage and is there any great storage options for tool pouches? Im in lines with you as well and tend to be over prepaired, but unfortunatly the teryx4 is lacking in the storage department.
 

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2016 Teryx2, 2011 Brute Force, 2008 Vulcan Classic 1500
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I have a T2, so I have tons of storage. A cooler, spare tire, chainsaw and a 5 gallon gas can in the bed, storage bin 1 has tools, jack, air pump, etc. Storage bin 2 holds tow straps, rubber boots, rain gear, etc. Fire extinguisher is mounted to roll bar, first aid kit and some spare ratchet straps are mounted in a roll bar bag behind the driver.

You can also get a storage bin that fits under your drivers seat and there are a number of great storage bins that better utilize your T4 bed space.
 

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I have a T2, so I have tons of storage. A cooler, spare tire, chainsaw and a 5 gallon gas can in the bed, storage bin 1 has tools, jack, air pump, etc. Storage bin 2 holds tow straps, rubber boots, rain gear, etc. Fire extinguisher is mounted to roll bar, first aid kit and some spare ratchet straps are mounted in a roll bar bag behind the driver.

You can also get a storage bin that fits under your drivers seat and there are a number of great storage bins that better utilize your T4 bed space.
yeah im more interested in bins for under the seat storage and cage/door bags for other esentials..i suppose i just need to take diminsions of the under driver seat space and do research to find what best suits that space.
 

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With cell service so widespread now, it makes this so much easier. Riding with several machines in a group, its really a cell phone and charger, tire repair stuff, and tow strap. If that don’t fix it, tow it out or ride out with a buddy and get what you need. I started getting so much stuff in my kit I had to have a talk with myself. in a group you can get out easy enough. Now alone in some back country in harsh weather, well you need a trailer for stuff to stay alive. I like having a state gazetteer of the state Im in. It shows even old logging roads and trails. And it’s it’s easy to read, instead of a phone screen map. For $20 they’re great to keep around.

 

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2016 Teryx2, 2011 Brute Force, 2008 Vulcan Classic 1500
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LOL Bama. Not sure where you ride, but no cell service where I go! We use hand-held hams for communications.

We can talk for 25 miles in some locations!
 

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I carry the following:
belt
metric wrenches
metric sockets
pliers
razor knife
3/8" impact gun (electric)
hammer
screw drivers
extensions
socket adapters
small impact gun
torx drivers
allen head drivers
compressor
plugs
tape
tie wraps
tow strap
hand lines
shackles
and probably more I can't think of or forgot
 

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LOL Bama. Not sure where you ride, but no cell service where I go! We use hand-held hams for communications.

We can talk for 25 miles in some locations!
yeah we don’t have the huge blm lands and the like to ride on. Worst is spotty cell service so far is all. Out west I would have to change it up. That’s why what you pack depends on your riding style, and location. And a lot of people riding nowadays just aren’t capable of fixing much of anything. I think a lot of people probably end up using there gear to help other people more than themselves. Which is great too. I got a sidewall slug and I think everyone should have 1 or 2 on hand.
 

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I am also an "over prepared" kind of guy, but we ride in some pretty remote and technical areas sometimes. On longer trail rides I carry a general tool kit including all of the tools needed to change a belt. In that bag I also carry spare fuses, large and small zip ties, gorilla tape, and a few towels for the windshield. I also carry a small scissor type jack, tire plug kit and slime, along with ratchet straps and an air compressor powerful enough to re-seat a bead. For my recovery kit I have a 50' winch cable extension, snatch blocks, D-rings, tow straps and a small shovel. I also have a 4 gallon Rotopax full of fuel and a spare tire most of the time. I have a small first aid and survival kit, including basic first aid and medicines, lighters, multi tool, portable saw, etc. Then I have a small dry bag with a full set of spare clothes in it, including socks and underwear - and stocking hat and gloves if winter. I will also carry paper maps for the area as a backup if available. For parts I just carry a spare belt and tie rod ends. I realize that this sounds like a lot of stuff when you type it out, but it all fits in a plastic box that takes up about half of the bed in my T4 (except tire and fuel). And there is still room in there for some snacks, rain gear, etc.
Most of my buddies make fun of me for all the crap I take but just on the last trip alone we needed the tire kit, jack and pump (several times), tools for minor repairs, several spare fuses, the shovel for trail building, snatch block and winch extension, and a tow strap. We even had to use my 22 mm socket to try and sleeve together a broken tie rod on a can am commander.
If you're riding alone in remote areas, I would practice changing a belt so that you know the process and are prepared to access or change it if necessary. It is a pain in the butt, but not something that should leave you stranded in the backcountry.
Here is the checklist of tools I use to make sure I have everything needed to change a belt (I also have the procedure for doing it typed out if you're interested):
2 Spreader bolts for secondary clutch (M8x1.25 x 60mm or 2.5”)
Phillips Screwdriver
Battery Impact wrench
Small Flathead for wire connections
Large flathead screwdriver and pliers or tool for removing rivets
Crescent wrench
10 mm wrench
17 mm wrench
8mm socket
10mm socket
12mm socket
14mm socket
17mm socket
22mm socket (secondary clutch)
27mm socket (primary)

Which air compressor do you use? I’m not sure the one I have is long term reliable. I’m also looking at some of the Co2 tire filling options. Tire repair and towing is my main concern.
 

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Which air compressor do you use? I’m not sure the one I have is long term reliable. I’m also looking at some of the Co2 tire filling options. Tire repair and towing is my main concern.
I have the Viair 85P that I use and it has been great. Very durable and reliable, and by using a ratchet strap around the tire we are able to pop them back on the rims pretty easily. It wasn't super expensive either, less than $100 I think. It has seen a lot of use over the years. I didn't want to go much bigger than that for fear of blowing fuses on an atv/sxs.
 

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I have the Viair 85P that I use and it has been great. Very durable and reliable, and by using a ratchet strap around the tire we are able to pop them back on the rims pretty easily. It wasn't super expensive either, less than $100 I think. It has seen a lot of use over the years. I didn't want to go much bigger than that for fear of blowing fuses on an atv/sxs.
ok thank you, that looks like a good one that will work and last a bit. Do you plug into the 12v outlet on the dash, or hook to battery?
 

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ok thank you, that looks like a good one that will work and last a bit. Do you plug into the 12v outlet on the dash, or hook to battery?
The one I have plugs into the 12v outlet... if you go much bigger I think they will require you to hook directly to the battery, which is a little more inconvenient on the Teryx.
 
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